Your website is the online home base for your small business. Even if you also have a brick and mortar store, your website is at the core of your online marketing strategy. Your website is so much more than your domain, your logo, and your layout. The words on your pages are what convey everything a customer needs to know about your business, what you offer, who you serve, and how you stand apart from your competitors.

There is a real art to copywriting. And that’s why I’m honored to host copywriter and content strategist, Barbara Chaney. Barbara can help you turn your website content from good to converting (into sales!). Keep reading below to learn from her. 

How to Get More Leads from your Website Copy

How to Get More Leads from your Website Copy

Q. First, can you talk a little bit about what pages every small business website should have?

A. Five pages is considered the standard for small business websites, but I don’t think of it as a hard rule. It really depends on how much information your prospects need to make a decision. Your prospects might need an FAQ page for further details, for example, or might benefit from extra service pages. It can vary. 

Overall, the recommended pages for a small business website are:

  1. Home page that tells visitors who you are, what you do and why they should choose you (as opposed to a competitor).
  2. An About page with a personal introduction to you or your team and how you help clients.
  3. Services or Product page that describes what you offer and for whom.
  4. Contact page that makes it easy for prospects to get in touch with you.
  5. Blog or Article section for content that will educate and inform prospects, showcase your expertise and lure in new visitors.

The 1-page website is still alive as a design trend, but I’m not a huge fan. They’re often a bit sparse with information because they’re trying to cater to the design. Plus, they’re harder to SEO.

Q. Next, what types of information should a service-based business have on any given service page?

A. It’s understood that a services page will list your services and what’s included. But what’s often missing are the items that answer prospects’ questions, gain their trust and help convert them into clients.

So first, think about what visitors may be asking themselves when they’re on your site:

  • How will I benefit by choosing this (consultant, planner, trainer, etc.) over others I’ve seen?
  • Does their service fit my needs or solve my problem?
  • Are they trusted by others? What kinds of results have they gained?

Answer these questions while focusing on the benefits of working with you and your understanding of their problem. You should: 

  • Start with a headline that points to a unique benefit or selling point of your service.
  • Describe your service and how it addresses their problem.
  • Describe whom it’s for.
  • Explain the benefits. What do they gain by using your service?
  • Earn their trust by explaining your process, listing previous clients and/or including testimonials.
  • Tell them what to do next with a call-to-action (contact, call, fill out a form, buy, etc.).

Q. What advice do you have for a small business owner to spruce up the content on their service page in order to improve lead generation?

A. There are a few areas where improvements can bring bigger results.

Q. Does your service page have a headline beyond just “Services”?

A. It’s not unusual to see a generic page name because of website templates or designers, but that’s wasting prime real estate on that page. Remember, you only have a few seconds to keep their attention or they’ll click away. Use a headline that tells them why your service is different. No need to be fancy. A headline that’s simple and clear is fine.

Q. What makes your service or offer unique?

A. This can be a challenge for many business owners, but it’s crucial if you’re asking them to choose you over your competitors. Maybe you serve a specific audience, which gives you better insight into their needs (tech support for law firms, for example)? Maybe you can guarantee quick turnaround time or certain results? Take a little time to describe why your service is different. 

Q. Most importantly, include a strong next step or call-to-action.

A. I’m a big believer in placing a call-to-action on every page and that’s especially true for a service page. When a visitor reaches the bottom of a page, they might go back up to the menu or they might just leave. Tell them what to do instead with a link or a button. It’ll lead them to taking the next step closer to a sale.

Q. Are there certain page layouts that work better for lead generation? What type of contact options should be included on a service page?

A. I think simpler designs with less distractions lead to better results. A service page can include some of the elements used in more sales-intensive landing pages. This includes keeping design simple and clear, with an obvious call-to-action. You can have more than one call-to-action, for example a button, link or form for those who want to get started now and another option for those who aren’t ready yet. But no more than that.  

As for contact options, you can send them to your contact page, but adding a form to the bottom of your service page is one less step. If you serve local customers, include a business phone number too and make it a click-to-call button.

Since we’re in the age of mobile, it’s always a good idea to check your site on your phone to see the visitor’s experience.

It can be a challenge to keep websites updated and new, but when you consider it’s the online HQ of your business, it’s a worthwhile investment of time and money.

Thanks for having me! I’m always happy to talk about websites and can be reached at clever-copy.com.

More about Barbara Chaney

Barbara Chaney is a copywriter and content strategist. For the past decade, she has enjoyed helping clients stand out online and grow their businesses. She founded Clever Copy after a career spent at PR agencies and in-house marketing departments. She now uses that experience to help businesses tell their stories and use digital media to bring in leads and conversions. When not working, she enjoys living in South Florida and exploring the local food scene with her husband and son.

Connect with Barbara

Website: Clever-copy.com
Facebook: @CleverCopyMiami
Twitter: @Nightwriter
Instagram: @Clever_Copy

 

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